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› Reading object states in eZ Publish 5

Object states are used in many ways in eZ Publish, from workflows to menu management to controlling SEO tags. In eZ Publish 5, object state information is not available by default as one of the intrinsic attributes of a content or location object. In this post, we will show you how to access object states in PHP (usually in your custom controllers) or in Twig templates.

30/10/2014 4:34 pm (UTC)   http://share.ez.no   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

mugo web

› Reading object states in eZ Publish 5

Object states are used in many ways in eZ Publish, from workflows to menu management to controlling SEO tags. In eZ Publish 5, object state information is not available by default as one of the intrinsic attributes of a content or location object. In this post, we will show you how to access object states in PHP (usually in your custom controllers) or in Twig templates.

30/10/2014 2:30 pm (UTC)   Mugo Web   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

ez publish community gateway

› Next episode of The eZ Publish Show: Is Sylius the base for the new eZ eCommerce solution?

Dear eZ Community,

Next episode of The eZ Publish Show will be aired on Thursday, October 30th at 16:00 CEST. In this episode we would like to check if Sylius, new eCommerce solution based on Symfony, could become the base for the new eZ eCommerce.

27/10/2014 10:51 am (UTC)   http://share.ez.no   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

netgen

› Four Strokes with Paweł Jędrzejewski

Paweł Jędrzejewski is creator of Sylius and founder at Lakion. Small interview, only four questions, but we managed to cover various topics like SummerCamp, eZ Publish Community, Sylius, Lakion, future of Paweł's projects and so on...

24/10/2014 9:31 pm (UTC)   http://www.netgenlabs.com/Blog   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

netgen

› What student summer practice, Summer Camp workshop rating and client rich web app have in common?

Having a habit of trying to hit more birds with one stone, I always try to find a combination of tasks that has multiple benefits for the company. As we wanted to give some practice to students and that an online rating system for the Summer Camp would be nice to have,  decision was a no-brainer. To make things a bit harder the solution should behave more like a web app: loaded once and using REST calls for rating.

21/10/2014 11:55 am (UTC)   http://www.netgenlabs.com/Blog   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

ez publish community gateway

› New in 5.3.3: Improved API performance

When using the PHP API introduced in 5.0, there has been some rough edges when it comes to performance. This has steadily been improved in each release, and in the immediate next releases there are further changes. With 5.3.3 just out lets dive into those changes and benchmark some of them.

17/10/2014 3:47 pm (UTC)   http://share.ez.no   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

ez publish community gateway

› New in 5.3.3 and 5.4: Improved API performance

When using the PHP API introduced in 5.0, there has been some rough edges when it comes to performance. This has steadily been improved in each release, and in the immediate next releases there are further changes. With 5.3.3 just out lets dive into those changes and benchmark some of them.

17/10/2014 3:47 pm (UTC)   http://share.ez.no   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

netgen

› A bunch of sites (re)launched in last 2 weeks

Of course, most of the work was done before this month but it was interesting how all launches were squeezed in just 2 weeks. Every second day we got a dose of launching hectic :)

17/10/2014 2:29 pm (UTC)   http://www.netgenlabs.com/Blog   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

netgen

› Overview of caching in eZ Publish new stack

Summer is over and we are returning to our usual duties: from working on projects to sharing our experience. As we started releasing sites based on eZ Publish 5 and Symfony, it is time to tell what we learned so far, at least some of the more interesting parts. And what would be better topic if not caching :) The post was written while preparing presentation for Zagreb PHP Conference earlier this month (slides can be found here).

15/10/2014 10:57 am (UTC)   http://www.netgenlabs.com/Blog   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us

derick rethans

› Walking the London LOOP - part 23 and 24

Walking the London LOOP - part 23 and 24

The last one! So insisted we had our breakfast at Jack's. It was sort of a tradition when we started doing the LOOP, but we had got slightly bored of it. But for the last one, we had to. After that, tubes to Oxford Circus, Mile End and Upminster Bridge.

Section 23

Just after leaving Upminster Bridge station, we encountered a rather bizarre situation: an HGV lodged in a florist. Apparently it had clipped the bridge, and then went straight into the building. How rude.

loop23-d36_9720.jpg

Shortly after, we passed the Windmill pub, but only saw the Upminster Windmill in the distance. After crossing a bridge over the Ingrebourne River we took a right turn to follow the river. Almost for the entire length of this section. First we encountered some playgrounds, but after a while we made our way into the Ingrebourne Valley Local Nature Reserve, which connects to the Hornchurch Country Park. Lots of wetlands, some ponds with birds, and a few buildings remaining from the second World War, when this was RAF Hornchurch. It was a fairly pleasant and level walk. One of the stranger features was the Ingrebourne Hill Bike Park however, when you can try out some mountain biking!

loop23-d36_9738.jpg

At the bottom of the park, we had to cross the busy A1306, but a new pedestrian crossing made that easier. On the other side we found a big Tesco's where we acquired some water. Passing a few pubs, with, uhm, not so decent ratings brought us into Rainham Village, with its clock tower war memorial and an old Norman church. A few minutes later we reached Rainham station, and the end of section 23. Here we also ran into another group walking the LOOP—and they were also attempting to finish it on the same day.

Section 24

After passing the other group on the footbridge over High Speed One, and crossing underneath the busy A13, we soon came to the Rainham Marshes. We followed a LOOP sign on a path through the Marshes. However, after a few minutes we noticed it wasn't quite following either the directions off the Walk London website, but also wasn't following the mapped route from OpenStreetMap. We back tracked a little and instead had to go through some industrial area around Ferry Lane. We then also didn't spot a LOOP sign for quite some time, and the directions were also slightly misleading too. I have reported the mismatched signing, and I actually hope they redirect the LOOP through the Marshes instead of around factories and a land fill!

loop24-d36_9761.jpg

Taking the mapped route did get us to the Thames quite soon though. Here we spotted lots of birds as we went past the Tilda rice factory. Just beyond the factory we stumbled upon a dozen concrete barges, originally part of a Mulberry Harbour used in the D-Day landings of the second World War. We also spotted The Diver, an artwork by John Kaufman.

loop24-d36_9796.jpg

The rest of the walk around the landfill area was kinda tedious, but easy going. We were however confused by some fence once getting to the Rainham Marshes proper. This reserve, run by the RSPB, is one of the few left over ancient marshes. They have a nice visitor's centre on the East side, which also had a very decent café. After a restorative slice of cake, and crossing a new footbridge, we had some fun with photographing all the PHP Elephpants. Not long after, we left the coast and made our way to Rainham station and the end of our journey around London.

We celebrated with our certificates and a small bottle of procescco. Mission accomplished!

loop24-d36_9803.jpg

We took 3½ hours for the last 18km. The weather was really chilly at around 17°C. It got greyer and greyer but we managed not to get rained upon until we got to West Hampstead, nearly home. Getting home was a bit tricky though, as after a beer quest at St. Pancras the Thames Link was having some issues.

In any case, we made it! What's next?

The photos that I took on this section, as well as the photos of the other sections of the LOOP, are available as a Flickr set.

15/10/2014 10:21 am (UTC)   Derick Rethans   View entry   Digg!  digg it!   del.icio.us  del.icio.us